Cyfroteka.pl

klikaj i czytaj online

Cyfro
Czytomierz
00107 009372 7441156 na godz. na dobę w sumie
The Polish Quarterly of International Affairs 1/2012 - ebook
The Polish Quarterly of International Affairs 1/2012 - ebook
Numer: Archiwum publikacji: numery archiwalne
Wydawca: Polski Instytut Spraw Międzynarodowych Język publikacji: polski
ISSN: Data wydania:
Lektor:
Kategoria: e-prasa >> dzienniki
Porównaj ceny (wydanie papierowe, wydanie cyfrowe).

The Polish Quarterly of International  Affairs jest anglojęzycznym kwartalnikiem Polskiego Instytutu Spraw Międzynarodowych poruszającym kwestie  Europy Środkowej i Wschodniej. Poprzez publikowane w nim artykuły  dotyczące współczesnych wydarzeń, stanowi forum do analiz i debat na  temat spraw międzynarodowych.
Każde wydanie zawiera zbiór autorskich artykułów poddanych ocenie „peer review”, a także recenzje książek.
The Polish Quarterly of International Affairs is the English  language journal and has a Central and Eastern European focus. It  provides a forum for the analysis and debate of international affairs  through a collection of original, peer reviewed articles on a  contemporary theme.


Darmowy fragment publikacji:


2012 WARSAW VOLUME 21 No. 1 CONTRIBUTORS Marcin Zaborowski—Director of the Polish Institute of International Affairs Jiøí Šedivý—First Deputy Defence Minister of the Czech Republic Eva Svobodová—Political Adviser of Minister Jiøí Šedivý Adam Bugajski—Director, Security Policy Department, Polish Ministry of Foreign Affairs Adam Daniel Rotfeld—Professor, Member of the NATO Group of Experts, Minister of Foreign Affairs (2005), Republic of Poland Beata Górka-Winter—International Security Programme Coordinator at Institute of International Affairs the Polish Jacek Durkalec—Analyst at the Polish Institute of International Affairs Marcin Andrzej Piotrowski—Analyst at the Polish Institute of International Affairs Ian Anthony—Research Coordinator at Stockholm International Peace Research Institute Gareth Chappell—Analyst at the Polish Institute of International Affairs Marcin Terlikowski—Analyst at the Polish Institute of International Affairs COVER PHOTO: Shutterstock COPY EDITORS: Brien Barnett, Dominika Pasterska PROOF-READING: Katarzyna Staniewska COVER DESIGN: Alicja Rotfeld, adapted by Dorota Do³êgowska TYPESET: Dorota Do³êgowska The views expressed in The Polish Quarterly of International Affairs are solely those of the authors. The Polish Quarterly of International Affairs is regularly presented in the catalogue of International Current Awareness Services, in Urlich’s International Periodical Directory, and in International Political Science Abstracts/Documentation Politique Internationale. Selected articles are included in the International Bibliography of the Social Sciences. Printed by Centrum Poligrafii Sp. z o.o., ul. £opuszañska 53, 02-232 Warszawa Edition: 400 copies. Sent to press in April 2012 CONTENTS NATO at the Crossroads (Marcin Zaborowski). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 INTRODUCTORY REMARKS Jiøí Šedivý, Eva Svobodová Czech Expectations for the Chicago Summit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Adam Bugajski The NATO Summit in Chicago: Poland’s Priorities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Adam Daniel Rotfeld NATO 2020: In Search of a Security Community . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 ARTICLES Beata Górka-Winter NATO in Afghanistan: An Enduring Commitment?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 Jacek Durkalec NATO Missile Defence: In Search of a Broader Role . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 Marcin Andrzej Piotrowski Iran’s Ballistic Missile Ambitions, Capabilities and Threat: An Overview of Available Information and Estimates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87 Ian Anthony NATO-Russia Relations: The State of Relations and Future Prospects. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119 Gareth Chappell, Marcin Terlikowski Turkey in NATO and towards CSDP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141 The Polish Quarterly of International Affairs, 2012, no. 1 3 REVIEWS (cid:129) NOTES Charles Kurzman: The Missing Martyrs: Why There Are So Few Muslim Terrorists (Kacper Rêkawek). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157 Gareth Jenkins: Political Islam in Turkey: Running West, Heading East? (Karol Kujawa) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 161 Valery Karbalevich: Alaksandr Lukashenko: Politicheskiy portret (Alexander Lukashenko: A Political Portrait) (Anna Dyner) . . . . . . . . . 165 4 The Polish Quarterly of International Affairs, 2012, no. 1 NATO at the Crossroads On the eve of the NATO summit in Chicago, the Alliance appears to be reaching a critical junction. During the Cold War, NATO’s purpose was defined first and foremost by the existence of the Soviet threat and the need to deter it. In this context, NATO’s Article 5 was the ultimate cornerstone and essence of the alliance. With the end of the Cold War, the Alliance successfully redefined itself by becoming predominantly a crisis-management operations organisation and through enlargement to former communist states. For NATO, no longer deterring an external threat but organising security became its essential role. But this could not last indefinitely. Further expansion of the Alliance is reaching its limits and the era of crisis-management operations is likely to come to an end following the pullout from Afghanistan. From this follow two fundamental questions: Is the Alliance in need of a new mission, and will the Chicago summit become a stepping stone in this process? As several authors in this volume point out, the Alliance’s future has already been defined in the New Strategic Concept adopted at the summit in Lisbon in 2010. NATO’s new doctrine states that its key roles are collective defence, crisis management and cooperative security. The implementation of these tasks, however, is challenged by the severe economic crisis in the Western world that has produced massive defence spending cuts and by the U.S. decision to pivot progressively away from Europe towards the Middle East and East Asia. This volume is composed almost entirely of contributions by authors from Central and Eastern Europe or those who also know and understand the region’s specificity and its security outlook. It was our intention to deliver a set of analyses that would represent a regional contribution to the debate on NATO’s future. Naturally, over the more than two decades since the end of the Cold War, Central European perspectives on security have moved closer to those of other NATO members; however, there is no doubt that a certain regional specificity remains. The reader will find that Central Europeans stress the centrality of Article 5, prefer the status quo in approaching NATO’s nuclear posture, and are supportive of the development of missile defence. Beyond these fundamentals, The Polish Quarterly of International Affairs, 2012, no. 1 5 Marcin Zaborowski the reader will find a variety of perspectives on some crucial issues, including NATO’s relationship with Russia. The last NATO summit held in the U.S. took place in Washington in 1999. Then, NATO agreed to commence the enlargement process by accepting three former members of the communist block: Czech Republic, Hungary and Poland. The NATO that emerged from that summit acquired a new mission, one that has proven to be of fundamental importance to the stability and security of Europe. There is hope Chicago will also succeed in opening a new chapter for the Alliance, this time with Central Europeans as co-shapers of a new NATO. April 2012 Marcin Zaborowski 6 The Polish Quarterly of International Affairs, 2012, no. 1
Pobierz darmowy fragment (pdf)

Gdzie kupić całą publikację:

The Polish Quarterly of International Affairs 1/2012
Numer:

Opinie na temat publikacji:


Inne popularne pozycje z tej kategorii:


Czytaj również: