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The Self Industry: Therapy and Fiction - ebook/pdf
The Self Industry: Therapy and Fiction - ebook/pdf
Autor: , , Liczba stron: 368
Wydawca: Uniwersytet Śląski Język publikacji: polski
ISBN: 978-8-3801-2425-7 Data wydania:
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Kategoria: ebooki >> nauka języków obcych >> angielski
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Publikacja dotyczy problemów powstałych na styku literatury i psychologii, w szczególności terapeutycznej funkcji tekstów, zarówno w odniesieniu do ich autorów, jaki i do czytelników. Autorzy poszczególnych artykułów poddają analizie różnorodne teksty kultury powstałe w dziewiętnastym i w dwudziestym wieku, pokazując, że nie tylko psychologia dostarcza narzędzi do odczytania (niekiedy na nowo) tekstów literackich, ale i literatura pomaga w zrozumieniu problemów z dziedziny psychologii.
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“The term ‘industry’ can be stretched, either towards the conjoined pil- lars of a society of mass consumption: the production of goods and the necessary production of desire in willing consumers; or towards the fabrication of mind and self among the synapses within the human brain: the spark within our flesh somehow enables an I and an eye to emerge, an identity that can (and should) then be implemented into the processes of the world out there, of the world that is not-I and not-eye.” (From the essay by Benjamin Betka) “Fiction” and “therapy” and relation between the two may provoke var- ious interpretations and approaches. The present volume comprises ar- ticles based on the papers delivered at The Self Industry: Therapy and Fiction symposium held in Ustroń, Poland, 21–24 September 2011, one of the annual conferences organized by the Institute of English Cultures and Literatures of the University of Silesia, Katowice. It is a unique com- bination of essays written by scholars from Poland, Germany, Sweden, Swaziland, and Australia and a comprehensive collection of insights into texts of culture and their therapeutic functions. More about this book PRICE 46 ZŁ (+ VAT) ISSN 0208-6336 ISBN 978-83-8012-425-7 T he S e lf nd I u s t r y T he ra p y a nd F i c t i o n The Self Industry Therapy and Fiction WYDAWNICTWO UNIWERSYTETU ŚLĄSKIEGO KATOWICE 2015 The Self Industry Therapy and Fiction NR 3360 The Self Industry Therapy and Fiction Edited by Jarosław Szurman Agnieszka Woźniakowska Krzysztof Kowalczyk ‑Twarowski Wydawnictwo Uniwersytetu Śląskiego • Katowice 2015 Editor of the Series: Historia Literatur Obcych Magdalena Wandzioch Referee Marek Paryż Contents Introduction Part One Narcissists and Neurotics. Writing of Dissent Niclas Johansson Narcissus and Narcissism in Early Psychoanalysis: The Intertextual Dialogue between Theme and Concept Maria Korusiewicz The Ajase Complex and Freudian Psychoanalysis: Some Notes on the Cultural Consequences of “Foundational Myths” Tadeusz Lewandowski A Critique of the Discourse of the Self in Michael Sandel’s Liberalism and the Limits of Justice Stephen Dewsbury The Self in Temporary Autonomous Zones Benjamin Betka De ‑Pressed Masses: Affective Dissonance in Melancholia, Disease, and the Screened (American?) World Tomasz Gnat Narcissus’s Narcosis: Formation of Self, Disintegration of Self: A  Question of Interactive Entertainment and Player ‑Character Identity Correlation 9 15 27 40 53 62 75 6 Contents Herstories: The Self and Women’s Literature Part Two Karen Ferreira ‑Meyers Doubling or Dividing the Self: Examples from Autofictional Writing as Influenced by Psychoanalysis Anna Bugajska Descent into Hell. Pauline Anstruther’s Long Way To Her Self Grażyna Zygadło “I change myself, I change the world.” Storytelling in Women’s Art Sławomir Kuźnicki Writing to Preserve the Self: A Woman’s Resistant Position in the Patriarchal Dys‑ topia of Margaret Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale Karolina Błeszyńska In the Search of Self: Female Identity and Subjectivity in Doris Lessing’s “To Room Nineteen” Part Three Therapy through Writing? Łukasz Giezek A Therapeutic Journal: Peter Ackroyd’s The Last Testament of Oscar Wilde Tomasz Markiewka T(h)au for Torture? Writing on Trial in Teodor Parnicki’s Novel The Finger of Threat Eliene Mąka ‑Poulain “In Violence and Epiphany”: Seamus Heaney’s North Wojciech Drąg Writing Cure? Narrating Loss in Kazuo Ishiguro’s An Artist of the Floating World and The Remains of the Day Anna Cholewa ‑Purgał Neo ‑Nihilism and the Self Industry of Logotherapy Małgorzata Nitka “So many pages a day.” Writing, Compulsion, and Modernity Agata Wilczek Unnameable Loss: Melancholy and Postmodern Writing 89 102 111 123 137 151 161 178 190 205 228 240 Contents Part Four Searching the Self Aleksandra Lubczyńska Illness – Therapy – Catharsis. Gender Roles, Camp, and Postmodern Identities in The Rocky Horror Picture Show Maria Perzyńska Therapy or Obsession? Dante Gabriel Rossetti’s Problems with His Self Jarosław Giza Trapped in a Vicious Circle of the Tragic Triad… Miltonian Satan and Conradian Kurtz’s Process of Unearthing Authentic Identity Stephen Harris Questioning the Cultural Industry of the Self: Fiction, Selfhood and Individualism in Patrick White’s The Vivisector Sławomir Konkol I Am Not Me. The (Re)construction of the Self in Graham Swift’s Ever After Alicja Bemben, Ewa Mazur ‑Wyganowska Romantic Legacy in Non ‑Romantic Times. Two Different ‑Similar Approaches to Searching for Self ‑Identity Monika Gorzelak Frame of Mind. Self Industry in Performance Wojciech Szymański Venice–Iceland: A Journey to Utopia 7 265 276 285 296 319 334 344 353 Introduction The present book comprises articles based on the papers delivered at The Self Industry. Therapy and Fiction symposium held in Ustroń, Poland, 21–24 Sep- tember 2011, one of the annual conferences organized by the Institute of English Cultures and Literatures of the University of Silesia, Katowice. In the conference call for papers we argued that: “The last 200 years have produced a staggering wealth of writing on the Self, at first mainly belles ‑lettres, later also non ‑fiction. Whether we take into con‑ sideration the High Romantics, such as Edgar Allan Poe, E. T. A. Hoffman, and Percy Bysshe Shelley, pursuing the Self through archetypes of the Self, or George Eliot’s fiction of apparently social concern (The Mill on the Floss, Middlemarch), or D. H. Lawrence’s and William Faulkner’s narratives, we are confronted with dramas of consciousness. The advent of analytical psychology afforded not only insights into the workings of the literary text, but also pointed to its frequent therapeutic meaning for the author, individual reader, and community. The work of Carl Gustav Jung and Stan Gooch, exploring the duality of man and stressing the need to foster a new consciousness by integrating the feminine and the mas‑ culine, Viktor Frankl’s doctrine of overcoming the ‘tragic triad’ (suffering, guilt, and transitoriness) and inner void by affirming Urvertrauen zum Dasein (‘the basic trust in Being’) in existential acts of the ‘will to meaning’, provided two frameworks for therapy. Sigmund Freud’s system provided another framework, but what is perhaps as significant, it was admired for two different reasons. Her‑ mann Hesse admired the clarity of Freud’s thinking combined with the beauty of language, while Thomas Mann – his literary characteristics: structure and form. This interface of writing and therapy, much as in such famous accounts as Augus‑ tine’s or Rousseau’s Confessions, constitutes an intellectual challenge in that its paradigms of exposure and suppression follow both tangled personal and rhe‑ torical agendas.” 10 Introduction The conference contributions provided an array of insights into the field sug‑ gested above that seemed to us to merit publication. For the purposes of clarity we have decided to divide the texts submitted into four parts. The first one, headed “Narcissists and Neurotics. Writing of Dissent,” begins with Niclas Johansson’s article studying the relation between narcissism as a lit‑ erary concept and its use in early psychoanalysis. Likewise, drawing on Freud’s theory, Maria Korusiewicz analyses the Ajase complex formulated by Kosawa Heisaku, a myth of opposite psychic forces leading to positive resolution based on three interconnected ideas: mutual love, forgiveness, and “great compassion.” Tadeusz Lewandowski’s contribution discusses the communitarian philosophy of Michael Sandel as a response to John Rawls’s liberal project in A Theory of Jus‑ tice. Invoking Protestant radicalism and what he terms “the buccaneer tradition,” Stephen Dewsbury in his article on Hakim Bey’s anarchist thought “The Self in Temporary Autonomous Zones” argues that self ‑creativity flourishes in places of non ‑permanence, historical, discursive, and psychological lacunae emerging at the interstices of established structures. Benjamin Betka’s “De ‑Pressed Masses: Affective Dissonance in Melancholy, Disease, and the Screened (American?) World” focuses on the “selving” processes in American culture which emerged in response to Freud’s theory. The article posits the self as text while realigning the neuroscientific concepts of “patient,” “health,” and “therapy.” The last article in this section is Tomasz Gnat’s “Narcissus’s Narcosis: Formation of Self, Disin‑ tegration of Self: A Question of Interactive Entertainment and Player ‑Character Identity Correlation” which discusses the questions of self formation and disinte‑ gration in interactive entertainment. The second part headed “Herstories. The Self and Women’s Literature” com‑ prises five articles. Karen Ferreira -Meyers in “Doubling or Dividing the Self: Examples from Autofictional Writing as Influenced by Psychoanalysis” investi‑ gates the inevitable link between psychoanalysis and autofiction in the work of Nina Bouraoui and Amélie Nothomb, studying the techniques whereby the two authors bring about a doubling or dividing of the Self into numerous conscious and unconscious sub ‑selves. Similarly, Anna Bugajska’s article “Descent Into Hell. Pauline Anstruther’s Long Way to Her Self” focuses on the idea of doppelgaenger in Charles Williams’s novel Descent Into Hell understood as the essential aspect of consciousness we learn to give up as part of our socialization, our terror and error, a  terrible good, not a  menacing shadow but something we sacrifice for the sake of others. Grażyna Zygadło’s contribution “ ‘I  change myself, I  change the world’…” analyses the functions of storytelling in ethnic literature, while Sławomir Kuźnicki’s reading of Margaret Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale stresses the self ‑therapeutic context of writing in an oppressive society. The last article in the section, “In the Search for Self: Female Identity and Subjectivity in Doris Lessing’s ‘To Room Nineteen’ ” inquires into the “othering” processes involved in true self -expression, a discussion relying on Julia Kristeva’s concept of abjection. Introduction 11 In “Therapy through Writing?,” part three of the volume, Łukasz Giezek dis‑ cusses Peter Ackroyd’s The Last Testament of Oscar Wilde, a metafictional novel in which the creation of the past and the self becomes both personal healing and a larger project of conferring meaning on the randomness of existence. Invok‑ ing Barthes, Bakhtin, and Jung, Tomasz Markiewka discusses the questions of authorship and self ‑identity in “T(h)au for Torture? Writing on Trial in Teodor Parnicki’s Novel The Finger of Threat.” Eliene Mąka ‑Poulain offers a  reading of one of Heaney’s most important collections of poetry in the article entitled “ ‘In Violence and Epiphany’: Seamus Heaney’s North.” Wojciech Drąg’s contribution focuses on the therapeutic function of literature in “Writing Cure? Narrating the Loss in Kazuo Ishiguro’s An Artist of the Floating World and The Remains of the Day.” The article written by Anna Cholewa‑Purgał focusses on logotherapy, a school of contemporary philosophy and a therapy based on finding meaning in one’s life, and sets it against contemporary culture of neo-nihilism. Małgorzata Nitka’s “ ‘So many pages a day’. Writing, Compulsion, and Modernity” discusses George Gissing’s “conscious insincerity of workmanship” against the background of George M. Beard’s Nervousness, Its Causes and Consequences, a study of neu‑ rasthenia. In her contribution, “Unnameable Loss: Melancholy and Postmodern Writing,” Agata Wilczek follows Paul de Man, Jacques Lacan, Julia Kristeva, and Walter Benjamin in pondering the consciousness of loss as one of the primary areas of linguistic expression. The fourth part is entitled “Searching the Self.” In the first article, invoking Judith Butler’s category of gender performativity and Michel Foucault’s idea of aesthetization of life, Aleksandra Lubczyńska analyses The Rocky Horror Picture Show in terms of illness and therapy vis ‑à ‑vis gender roles in camp aesthetic. What follows is the article entitled “Therapy or Obsession? Dante Gabriel Ros‑ setti’s Problems with His Self” where Maria Perzyńska analyses the autobio‑ graphical aspect of Rossetti’s poetry and painting, especially the influence of his relationships with Lizzie Siddal and Jane Morris on his work. “Trapped in a  Vicious Circle of the Tragic Triad… Miltonian Satan and Conradian Kurtz’s Process of Unearthing Authentic Identity” by Jarosław Giza addresses the prob‑ lem of ensnarement of Milton’s and Conrad’s protagonists in Frankl’s tragic triad perceived paradoxically as a  constituent of the process of recovering genuine self. Stephen Harris’s article “Questioning the Cultural Industry of the Self: Fic‑ tion, Selfhood and Individualism in Patrick White’s The Vivisector,” shows how the author in question explores, in his idiosyncratic way, the possibilities and limits of individual selfhood as imagined against the constraints of Australian society and attitudes. Sławomir Konkol, in turn, conducts a Lacanian analysis in “I Am Not Me. The (Re)construction of the Self in Graham Swift’s Ever After.” The focus of the next contribution, “Romantic Legacy in Non ‑Romantic Times. Two Different ‑Similar Approaches to Searching for Self ‑Identity” by Alicja Bemben and Ewa Mazur -Wyganowska, is how Patrick Kavanagh and Robert 12 Introduction Graves exploit spirituality and mysticism in the process of poetic self ‑definition. In “Frame of Mind. Self Industry in Performance,” Monika Gorzelak uses the Derridean category of supplement to offer her interpretation of Sketches about Ophelia, a  dramatic performance by Teatr A  Part. Last but not least, Wojciech Szymański’s contribution “Venice–Iceland: A  Journey to Utopia,” is a  study of non ‑normative sexual identity focused on W. H. Auden, Christopher Isherwood, and Stephen Spender. We wish to thank all the contributors who made the publication of this vol‑ ume possible and we hope that the reading of the essays included in this collec‑ tion will offer new “therapeutic” insights into cultural and literary texts. The Editors Copy editor Krystian Wojcieszuk Cover designer Kamil Gorlicki Technical editor Małgorzata Pleśniar Proofreader Gabriela Marszołek Typesetting and text make up Marek Zagniński Copyright © 2015 by Wydawnictwo Uniwersytetu Śląskiego All rights reserved ISSN 0208 ‑6336 ISBN 978 ‑83 ‑8012 ‑424 ‑0 (print edition) ISBN 978 ‑83 ‑8012 ‑425 ‑7 (digital edition) Published by Wydawnictwo Uniwersytetu Śląskiego ul. Bankowa 12B, 40‑007 Katowice www.wydawnictwo.us.edu.pl e‑mail: wydawus@us.edu.pl First impression. Printed sheets 23.0. Publishing sheets 31,5. Offset paper, grade III, 90 g Price 46 zł Printing and binding: EXPOL, P. Rybiński, J. Dąbek, Spółka Jawna ul. Brzeska 4, 87 -800 Włocławek “The term ‘industry’ can be stretched, either towards the conjoined pil- lars of a society of mass consumption: the production of goods and the necessary production of desire in willing consumers; or towards the fabrication of mind and self among the synapses within the human brain: the spark within our flesh somehow enables an I and an eye to emerge, an identity that can (and should) then be implemented into the processes of the world out there, of the world that is not-I and not-eye.” (From the essay by Benjamin Betka) “Fiction” and “therapy” and relation between the two may provoke var- ious interpretations and approaches. The present volume comprises ar- ticles based on the papers delivered at The Self Industry: Therapy and Fiction symposium held in Ustroń, Poland, 21–24 September 2011, one of the annual conferences organized by the Institute of English Cultures and Literatures of the University of Silesia, Katowice. It is a unique com- bination of essays written by scholars from Poland, Germany, Sweden, Swaziland, and Australia and a comprehensive collection of insights into texts of culture and their therapeutic functions. More about this book PRICE 46 ZŁ (+ VAT) ISSN 0208-6336 ISBN 978-83-8012-425-7 T he S e lf nd I u s t r y T he ra p y a nd F i c t i o n The Self Industry Therapy and Fiction WYDAWNICTWO UNIWERSYTETU ŚLĄSKIEGO KATOWICE 2015
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